Correlation of Spirometry and Health- Related Quality of Life with Mental Health in Respiratory Chemical Damaged Veterans - Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences
Volume 23, Number 107 (12-2013)                   J Mazandaran Univ Med Sci 2013, 23(107): 49-56 | Back to browse issues page


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Arefnasab Z, Ghanei M, Noorbala A A, Alipour A, Babamahmoodi A. Correlation of Spirometry and Health- Related Quality of Life with Mental Health in Respiratory Chemical Damaged Veterans. J Mazandaran Univ Med Sci. 2013; 23 (107) :49-56
URL: http://jmums.mazums.ac.ir/article-1-2999-en.html

Abstract:   (11703 Views)
Background and purpose: Psychiatric disorders as a chronic illness lead to the exacerbation of physical symptoms and controlling them is very difficult. Respiratory chemical damaged veterans have many different psychiatric problems and low health-related quality of life. In this study, we evaluated the relations of spirometry parameters and health- related quality of life with mental health. Material and methods: This was a descriptive- co relational study done on 41 respiratory chemical veterans (Iran-Iraq war) selected with randomized available sampling in Tehran City. We used Spirometry test, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) & General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) for assessing the patients and Pearson's correlation matrix for analyzing the data. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the total score of GHQ and depression subscale with FVC & FEV1. There were significant positive correlations between the total score of GHQ and depression & anxiety subscales with total score of SGRQ. There were significant positive correlations between the total score of GHQ and depression & anxiety subscales with "symptoms" score of SGRQ. There were significant positive correlations between the total score of GHQ and depression & anxiety subscales with "impacts" score of SGRQ. Conclusion: Poor mental health condition with increased level of depression & anxiety leads to the decrease in FVC & FEV1 in spirometry and health-related quality of life, and increase in respiratory symptoms such as cough, breathless and sneezing. Totally, there were significant correlations between spirometry and health-related quality of life with mental health. It seems that in rehabilitation programs for mustard gas exposed veterans with chronic respiratory diseases, the psychological and psychiatric interventions should be considered.
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Type of Study: Research(Original) | Subject: psychiatry

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